Monday, March 20, 2017


republished below in full unedited for informational, educational, and research purposes:
 LOS ANGELES — Pop star Katheryn Hudson, who goes by 
the stage name Katy Perry, mocked her Christian upbringing on Saturday 
as she received an award from a prominent homosexual advocacy 
Hudson, the daughter of evangelical minister Keith Hudson and former CCM artist, pointed to her 2008 hit song “I Kissed a Girl” as she told those gathered at the Human Rights Campaign’s gala that “I did more than that,” generating cheers and applause.
“[H]ow was I going to reconcile that with the gospel-singing girl raised in youth groups that were pro-conversion camps?” she asked. “What I did know was I was curious, and even then I knew sexuality was not as black and white as this dress.”
Hudson noted that she was brought up to know homosexual behavior was wrong, and that she prayed against such temptations as a youth.

“My first words were Mama and Dada, God and Satan,” she said. “Right and wrong were taught to me on felt boards, and of course, through the glamorous Jan Crouch crying diamond teardrops every night on that vaseline TBN television screen.”
“When I was growing up, homosexuality was synonymous with the word abomination and Hell, a place of gnashing of teeth, continuing burning of skin, and probably Mike Pence’s ultimate guest list for a barbeque,” Hudson jeered. “No way. I wanted the pearly gates and the unlimited froyo toppings, so most of my unconscious adolescence, I prayed the gay away at my Jesus camps.”
She said that when she broke into the secular music industry, it took her out of the Christian “bubble” and she met those who identified as homosexual. Hudson praised them as being “magic” for “living their truth.”

“But then in the middle of it all, in a twist of events, I found my gift, and my gift introduced me to people outside my bubble, and my bubble started to burst,” Hudson stated. “These people were nothing like I had been taught to fear. They were the most free, strong, kind and inclusive people I have ever met.”
“They stimulated my mind, and they filled my heart with joy, and they [expletive] danced with joy while doing it. These people are actually magic, and they are magic because they are living their truth,” she said.
Hudson said that the experience began her evolution.
“What a revelation—and not the last chapter of the Bible,” she declared, generating laughter. “I hope I stand here as evidence for all that no matter where you came from, it’s about where you are going.”
Hudson also also counseled those gathered that the “little voice inside of you pushing you to discover who you are is a trusted friend.”
As previously reported, Hudson began singing as a CCM artist at age 15, and released her first national album in 2001.
“He’ll prevail in the midst of all my sin and temptations,” she sang out on the song “Faith Won’t Fail,” featured on her self-titled debut album.
In an interview with CCM Magazine, Hudson stated that one her musical influences was Keith Green, who was known to be bold in his lyrical witness for Christ.
However, in 2007, she signed with with the secular label Capitol Records, and soon released her first single, “I Kissed a Girl,” which rose to the number one position on the secular pop charts. The popularity of Hudson’s single brought continued national attention until she became one of the most well-known pop artists in the secular music industry. She later announced that she no longer professed to be a Christian.
“I don’t believe in a Heaven or a Hell, or an old man sitting on a throne,” Hudson told Marie Claire Magazine in 2013. “I’m not Buddhist, I’m not Hindu, I’m not Christian, but I still feel like I have a deep connection with God.”
Her parents have stated that they do not agree with all the choices that their daughter has made during her career.
In a book proposal by Hudson’s mother, which was shopped in 2011, Mary Hudson reportedly outlined a number of concerns to set the record straight about her feelings.
“I recognized the psalmist gift in her performance. Yet she sang out, ‘I kissed a girl, and I liked it,’ while thousands joined her,” she wrote. “One part of my heart soared … [but] the other part broke for the thousands of hungry souls being fed something that didn’t nourish their spirit, but fed their flesh.”
U.K. preacher J.C. Ryle (1816-1900) once said in referencing 1 Peter 5:8, “That mighty [devil] who did not fear to attack Jesus himself is still going about as a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.”